Monthly Archives: April 2011

Tax Day Introduction

Hello and happy Tax Day! At MethodLogical, it’s a bittersweet day. On the one hand, we are confronted with the shrinking of our already meager salaries. On the other hand, the annual levy collects funds for important development projects like … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A Function of Reduction of Deductions

One of my college mentors, Rob Reich (no, not that Rob Reich), is a political theorist who spends a lot of time thinking about public service and often ends up challenging conventional wisdom on the subject. While I’ll admit that … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Stress and inequality bleg

Here’s a question I’m wrestling with: at what level of aggregation do we expect an inequality-stress-health link to operate? That is, typically researchers focus on the level of a country. In that model, would inequality within a state/territory be more … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Dennis Whittle misses the forest

Today’s Aid Watch post by Dennis Whittle raises a great question – shouldn’t we care about the distribution of aid impacts, and not just the average? – but then doesn’t seem to answer it at all. He talks about how … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Shout outs

In the process of looking through the research paper that underlies the Michael Clemens post I linked to, I realized that the RA for the paper was Paolo Abarcar, who is actually one of my classmates here at Michigan economics. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Legalizing Bribery to Reduce Corruption?

Interesting article on Marginal Revolution suggesting that by making it legal to give a bribe (but illegal to accept one), countries could reduce corruption. Basically, by decriminalizing bribe-giving, people who were forced to bribe officials can report it without legal … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Waiting for Marshmallows

In the 1960s, Stanford University pyschologist Michael Mischel conducted the famous ‘marshmallow study’¬†demonstrating a correlation between a child’s ability to delay immediate gratification and that same child to achieve positive education and health outcomes later in life. ¬†Is this study … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments